Politics

Open Access (free)

Series:

Lamine Kane, Aliou Guissé and Latyr Diouf

Lamine Kane and Juliet Millican used a travel grant from the British Council to meet for exploratory discussions in Dakar with members of sub-Saharan Africa Participatory Action Research Network (REPAS), the Department of Applied Economics (ENEA) at Cheikh Diop University (UCAD), and nearby local communities. These discussions led to the joint preparation of a full project proposal, which was funded by a partnership grant from the British Council. It was against the backdrop that the partners launched their new project. The initiative aimed to pilot a new six-month postgraduate course for students from Cheikh Anta Diop University and ENEA leading to a Certificate in Community Engagement for Employability and Entrepreneurship. Senegal is a former French colony and Dakar was the base from which France conceived and implemented its 'assimilation policy', which aimed to make Senegalese citizens French and to integrate them into the French culture and nation.

Open Access (free)

Social financing, social economy

Chantier de l’Économie Sociale Trust, Montreal

Series:

Jean-Marc Fontan and Denis Bussières

Managers of social economy enterprises have been expressing the need to have access to financial products other than traditional grants and loans, while at the same time asking how best to maintain their business capital over the long term. They deemed that new products which kept their social mission in mind would be needed. At the request of the Chantier de l'Economie Sociale Trust, a study on these issues was initiated by the Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) on the social economy. A working group gathered key players in the social economy sector and university researchers interested in the question of financing within this sector. A research partnership group for financing the social economy finance known as the Chantier d'activite partenariale Financement (CAP) was created within the social economy CURA. Politically, the Fiducie supports Quebec's social innovation system, developed around the social economy.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Mandakini Pant

Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) initiated a project in 2008 on Women Political Empowerment and Leadership (WPEL) to address the gaps in the education and training of women leaders for political roles in institutions of local self-governance, at both urban and rural levels. The Prem Chadha Memorial Youth Leadership Programme was initiated by PRIA in memory of the late Mr Prem Chadha, a founder of PRIA. The programme Strengthening Scheduled Caste Leadership in Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) aims to strengthen SC leadership by providing them opportunities for systematic learning; facilitating such learning; and supporting capacity enhancement on an ongoing basis. While women elected representatives (WERs) share a political mandate of leadership as people's representatives, non-WERs from informal associations, self-help groups (SHGs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) assume de facto leadership roles.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Norbert Steinhaus

The Danish Society for the Conservation of Nature (DN) of Frederikssund is a local committee of a national non-governmental organization (NGO) working towards protecting nature and the environment. DN Frederikssund addresses local issues regarding the protection of nature and the environment to achieve local sustainable development. It initiates local campaigns, participates in political hearings and comments on the municipality's environmental strategies and plans. In the mid-1990s, DN Frederikssund became aware of science shops through correspondence from the science shops at Roskilde University Centre (RUC). DN Frederikssund saw this as an opportunity to engage in research about the pollution levels in village ponds in Frederikssund municipality. DN Frederikssund has defined more project requests for the science shops at RUC and the University of Copenhagen (KU). The NGO was able to use the results to pressure the municipality of Frederikssund on the issue of the lakes' health.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Crystal Tremblay and Sarah Amyot

People who live off materials recovered from the waste stream exist in every corner of the world. However, these recyclers are among the most exploited and socially and economically excluded people. Recyclers face enormous stigmatization, discrimination and marginalization. This project focused on participatory waste management as an opportunity to generate income and improve the quality of life of informal recyclers (called catadores in Brazil), while promoting environmental sustainability and inclusive public policies on integrated waste management. The project has also made a number of contributions to theorizing the social and solidarity economies, areas of research that remain relatively undertheorized, while also contributing to the critical discourse on collective commercialization and microcredit. Further, the research has helped to expand the body of theory about community-based research and empowerment concepts.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Felix M. Bivens

The Outreach and Community Service programme at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, was created in 1989. It was part of a wave of many such programmes started by US universities and colleges in the late 1980s and early 1990s, bolstered by Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered report for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The University of the South, more commonly referred to as Sewanee, is a small, private liberal-arts college owned by the twenty-six southern dioceses of the Episcopal Church. Since 2003, the outreach programme has been pivotal in enabling a series of new courses which include action learning and community-based research (CBR). The series of new courses includes summer-in-South-Asia programme, documentary photography, human health in the environment, politics of poverty, medical ethics, introduction to anthropology, civil rights, music and social change, and community-engagement minor.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Mandakini Pant

University-community partner equitably contributes their expertise and shares responsibility and ownership to enhance understanding, integrate the knowledge gained, with action to improve the well-being of community members and foster sustainable development. Community-university partnerships can serve as an entry point where local community-based organizations, village communities and public (government) agencies work together in the area of community development and educational enrichment. The cases of Mountain Development Research Centre (MDRC) and Rural Extension Centre's (REC) rural library services show that partnership with community members and civil society organizations (CSOs) has a potential for valuing indigenous knowledge, and knowledge production around citizens' concerns. Rural reconstruction programmes in Sriniketan were primarily organized and coordinated by the REC. The objective of a rural circulating library was to retain acquired literacy skills after education.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Nirmala Lall

Using the lens of global perspectives, this chapter explores the form, function and impact of community-university research partnerships. It examines participatory approaches to research and impacts that serve to foster, facilitate and strengthen the unique relationship and democratic knowledge exchange process between partners, participants and across the sectors they represent. The chapter demonstrates that the process of measuring impact is informed by how partners and participants directly and indirectly involved in community-university research partnerships. It presents examples of hybrid approaches to assessment and evaluation of community-university research partnerships. Community-university research partners at the University of Brighton's Community-University Partnership Programme (CUPP) apply a theory of change to identify a pathway of change, which includes indicators to measure success leading to particular outcomes. Local, regional, national and international community-university research partnership structures, networked together, offer greater opportunities to draw on global perspectives and act in global arenas.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Felix M. Bivens

The MA in Participation (MAP) had its first intake of students in 2004. MAP is the product of several years of planning and more years of previous work by the Participation, Power and Social Change (PPSC) team at Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. The roots of PPSC connect to the highly influential work of Robert Chambers in the field of participatory development. The curriculum for the first term of MAP has two courses, Foundations of Participation, and Ideas in Development. Foundations of Participation is designed for and open only to MAP students. It is basically two courses in one, divided into two distinct streams: Action Research and Reflective Practice; and Power, Participation and Social Change. The Action Research/ Reflective Practice stream is less conventional in its structure and is key to what makes MAP an innovative programme, curricularly and pedagogically.

Open Access (free)

Series:

Budd L. Hall

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book focuses on community-university research partnerships rather than the broader community-university engagement. It looks at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships. The book provides evidence of the impact of community-university research partnerships on the curriculum in several higher education institutions (HEIs). It talks about the policy dance that community-university research partnerships are engaged in, by looking at the work of the European science shop movement. The book offers some thoughts on the future of community-university research partnerships within the context of a knowledge democracy movement. It is an evaluation framework for partnership research that has emerged from important work in Quebec.