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From the Twin Plagues of European Locusts to Africa’s Triple Quest for Emancipation
Adekeye Adebajo

This chapter reviews the history of Africa’s quest for Pan-African unity in the areas of politics, socio-economic development, and culture, and puts this in the context of the 39 figures of Pan-Africanism in this book in relation to their intellectual thought and individual struggles.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
Africa’s Quest for Authentic Knowledge
M. John Lamola

This chapter focuses on the Pan-Africanist philosophy of Beninois scholar-politician, Paulin Hountondji, and his quest to develop an African epistemology that was self-dependent and academically rigorous.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Regeneration of Africa
Bongani Ngqulunga

This chapter assesses the life and times of Pixley Seme, one of the founding members of South Africa’s African National Congress (ANC) in 1912 and its president-general between 1930 and 1936. The chapter also examines Seme’s efforts to fight racial injustice in neighbouring Swaziland.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Foreign Policy Virtuoso
Pearl T. Robinson

This chapter analyses the activism of African-American civil rights lawyer, Randall Robinson, who used the TransAfrica Forum to wage the anti-apartheid struggle in the US in the 1970s and 1980s (pushing for economic and other sanctions), as well as to oppose military rule and to restore democracy in Haiti in the early 1990s.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Revolutionary
Maureen Isaacson

This chapter examines the Pan-Africanism of South African scholar-activist, Ruth First, through her intellectual work on Namibia and an analysis of military coups d’état in Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, and Ghana, as well as her activism in Mozambique.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Philosopher of Black Consciousness
N. Barney Pityana

This chapter examines the philosophy of Black Consciousness as advocated by Steve Biko in order to increase the consciousness and self-confidence of South Africa’s black masses to liberate themselves.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Making of a “Post-Colonial” Sociologist
Zine Magubane

This chapter analyses Jamaican sociologist and cultural theorist, Stuart Hall, who was one of the pioneers of the “Birmingham School of Cultural Studies”. She assesses how Hall incorporated issues of race, gender, and hegemony into cultural studies, and how culture, race, and ethnicity contributed to creating the politics of Black Diasporic identities.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Pan-African Philosopher-King
Adekeye Adebajo

This chapter examines the Pan-Africanism of former South African president Thabo Mbeki, comparing him to Kwame Nkrumah, before examining his efforts at building institutions of the African Union and engaging the African Diaspora in America, the Caribbean, and Brazil.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Philosopher-Poet
Kwabena Opoku-Agyemang and Cheikh Thiam

This chapter examines the philosophy of Congolese intellectual, V.Y. Mudimbe, through a close textual reading of his preface to his 1971 collection of poems, Déchirures.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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“The Father of Pan-Africanism”?
Aldon D. Morris

This chapter examines the African-American intellectual’s contributions to the movement, especially between 1919 and 1945 when he played a leading role in the five Pan-African Congresses in Paris, London, New York, and Manchester, before moving to Kwame Nkrumah’s Ghana to spend the last years of his life.

in The Pan-African Pantheon