The Afro-Arab Peacemaker
Adekeye Adebajo

This chapter examines the Pan-African peacemaking of Africa’s first UN Secretary-General, Egypt’s Boutros Boutros-Ghali between 1992 and 1996, including his conflict management efforts in Angola, Mozambique, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, and Rwanda, and his landmark 1992 An Agenda For Peace report.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Burden of Exile
Louisa Uchum Egbunike

This chapter examines the work of a pioneering Nigerian writer Buchi Emecheta, on women’s liberation and themes of the Diaspora that she explored through novels that drew heavily from her own life experiences.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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With Africa on His Mind
Selwyn R. Cudjoe

This chapter assesses the activist career of Trinidadian scholar, C.L.R James, who was a pioneering voice in post-colonial studies. James was also a political activist who focused centrally on subaltern studies. His 1938 Black Jacobins - a classic of the Haitian revolution – is examined.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Black Power and “The Myth of My Own Self”
Vladimir Lucien

This chapter assesses the career of St. Lucian Nobel literature-winning playwright and poet, Derek Walcott, through an examination of some of his key texts, including an analysis of his discomfort with the proponents of “Black Power” in the 1960s and 1970s.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Politician and Diplomat
W. Andy Knight

This chapter examines the Pan-African career of Jamaica’s Dudley Thompson, a lawyer who put together the legal defence team that defended Kenya’s Jomo Kenyatta from charges of being an instigator of the Mau Mau rebellion against British colonial rule in 1952. Thompson was also a founder member of the Tanganyika African National Union (TANU), and served as his country’s ambassador to Nigeria, Senegal, Ghana and Namibia.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
Pan-African Pioneer
Gilbert M. Khadiagala

This chapter assesses the contributions of scholar-diplomat Edward Blyden – sometimes referred to as the “Father of Pan-Africanism” – to the movement through his concept of “Ethiopianism” which urged African Americans in the Diaspora to return to Africa to help develop the continent.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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A Felasophy of Kalakuta Republic and African Citizenship
Sola Olorunyomi

This chapter examines the Pan-African and civil rights struggles of radical anti-establishment Nigerian musician, Fela Anikulapo-Kuti.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Philosopher of Democracy and Development
L. Adele Jinadu

This chapter examines the philosophy of Martinique’s Frantz Fanon as a political theorist of democracy and a political sociologist of development, as well as his Marxist ideas on revolutionary change in Africa (based on his direct experiences in civil war Algeria), and his critique of the first generation of post-independence African leaders.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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The Pan-African Scholar-Activist
Seamus Duggan

This chapter examines the career and contributions of Trinidadian thinker, George Padmore, to the Pan-African movement, and his activism in the Communist International. Duggan assesses Padmore’s enormous intellectual and organisational contributions to Pan-Africanism.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
Global Africa, Reparations, and the End of Pan-Africanism
Hilary Beckles

This chapter argues that African delegates at the United Nations (UN) World Conference on Racism in 2001 betrayed the African and Caribbean cause for reparations for slavery and colonialism, and calls for a reorientation of the relationship of Africa with its Diaspora.

in The Pan-African Pantheon