The Cosmopolitan Pan-Africanist
Kweku Ampiah

This chapter interrogates the ideas of Ghanaian-British philosopher, Kwame Anthony Appiah, about Pan-Africanism, including critiquing what Appiah regarded as the racist essentialism of early Pan-Africanists such as Alexander Crummell.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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“A Great African, But Not a Great Ghanaian”?
Ama Biney

This chapter analyses the Pan-Africanism of Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah within the controversial 1966 debate by Kenyan scholar, Ali Mazrui, that Nkrumah will be remembered more as a great Pan-African than a great Ghanaian.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Poet-President of Négritude
Abiola Irele

This chapter assesses Martinique’s Aimé Césaire and Senegal’s Léopold Senghor development of the idea of négritude which glorified black culture, looking back nostalgically at a rich African past, and affirming the worth and dignity of black people across the globe.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-African Crusader for Social Justice
Lee A. Daniels

This chapter examines the civil rights struggles of Malcolm X and his latter efforts to promote Pan-African unity through his travels to Africa with his Organisation of Afro-American Unity.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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“Africa for the Africans”
Colin Grant

This chapter traces Garvey’s struggles to lead a “Back to Africa” Movement through the Universal Negro Improvement and Conservation Association and African Communities Imperial League (UNIA), as well as his activism in the US and Caribbean.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pioneering Feminist
Ada Uzoamaka Azodo

This chapter assesses the work of another pioneering woman feminist, Senegal’s Mariama Bâ, through her two major novels which call for the development of a liberated, egalitarian, and progressive African society, free of patriarchy.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Pan-Africanism within a Politics of Respectability
Alease Brown

This chapter examines the activism of African-American writer, poet, singer, and actress, Maya Angelou through her autobiographies which described her three-year sojourn in Kwame Nkrumah’s Ghana between 1962 and 1965, and her time in Egypt between 1961 and 1962.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Making Life Sing in Pursuit of Utu
Ndirangu Wachanga

This chapter assesses the work and activism of Kenyan writer, Micere Mugo, who promoted curriculum transformation at the University of Nairobi before living in political exile in Zimbabwe and the US.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
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Mama Africa
Nomsa Mwamuka

This chapter assesses the Pan-Africanist activism of South African singer, Miriam Makeba, who used her music and speeches to campaign against apartheid at the UN and other international fora. She also lived in Guinea, and travelled across Africa and its Diaspora spreading her message.

in The Pan-African Pantheon
Editor: Adekeye Adebajo

This collection of lively biographical essays examines historical and contemporary Pan-Africanism as an ideology of emancipation and unity. The volume covers thirty-six major figures, including well-known Pan-Africanists such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Amy Ashwood Garvey, C.L.R. James, George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah, Frantz Fanon, Steve Biko, and Thabo Mbeki, as well as popular figures not typically identified with mainstream Pan-Africanism such as Maya Angelou, Mariama Bâ, Buchi Emecheta, Miriam Makeba, Ruth First, Wangari Maathai, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, V.Y. Mudimbe, Léopold Senghor, Malcolm X, Bob Marley, and Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. The book explores the history and pioneers of the movement; the quest for reparations; politicians; poets; activists; as well as Pan-Africanism in the social sciences, philosophy, literature, and its musical activists. With contributions from a diverse and prominent group of African, Caribbean, and African-American scholars, The Pan-African Pantheon is a comprehensive and diverse introductory reader for specialists and general readers alike.