Religion

Religious and commercial (dis)order in eighteenth-century Altona
Johannes Ljungberg

This chapter demonstrates how the implementation of the Danish Sabbath ordinance, a reform introduced by the confessional state, was invigorated by the introduction of police regulations in the eighteenth century. Taking the extreme example of Altona, the first free town of the Danish realm, the chapter demonstrates how the city’s police director praised the ordinance as being a useful tool for an ‘enlightened government’. In practice, it caused tension between two Enlightenment values that were characteristic of the city: commercial interest and tolerance of religious pluralism. The case study indicates the advantages of studying confessional culture and Enlightenment as coexisting and intertwined phenomena in the eighteenth century.

in Religious Enlightenment in the eighteenth-century Nordic countries
Open Access (free)
St Erik of Sweden in eighteenth-century Swedish history-writing
Henrik Ågren

Whereas previous generations of historians had been relatively tolerant towards some of the expressions of medieval Christianity, this chapter reveals how an emphasis on common-sense rationality led to increasingly hostile views of the ‘Catholic past’ among late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Swedish historians. By means of close analysis of the era’s principal historical works, the chapter demonstrates how Swedish authors managed to simultaneously criticize a competing faith system and mark their own time as civilized and rational. The chapter concludes that the Enlightenment had a bigger impact than the Reformation with regard to the re-evaluation of Sweden’s Catholic past.

in Religious Enlightenment in the eighteenth-century Nordic countries
Open Access (free)
The Finnish self-taught and disabled man as a writer of ephemeral literature
Tuija Laine

The literary output of the Finnish disabled and self-taught writer Tuomas Ragvaldinpoika (1724–1804) is explored in this chapter, which supplies a close reading of his various works. It is argued that Ragvaldinpoika trod a fine line between the ideas of Lutheran orthodoxy and of the Enlightenment. His autobiographical texts represent a comparatively new world view; but the commercial texts written for other people’s funerals and weddings adhered to traditional lines, reflecting features of Lutheran orthodoxy, Pietism and folk belief. From the Enlightenment, Ragvaldinpoika especially adopted conceptions about medicine and doctors. This chapter offers a unique view of how old and new ideals blended in a rural voice placed very much at the margins of society.

in Religious Enlightenment in the eighteenth-century Nordic countries
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Anna Tiziana Drago

The study introduces the reader to the Aldine edition of the Greek epistolographers published by Marcus Musurus in 1499.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Anna Tiziana Drago

In this article, I analyse the manuscript sources used by Marcus Musurus for the letters of Alciphron and Theophylact Simocatta, examining in both cases the organisation of the letters, the reasons for what may be disturbances in their order, the possible Druckvorlage, and the variants in the Aldine edition traceable to attempts by Musurus to improve the text. Although it is quite difficult to recover the original shape of the works of Alciphron and Theophylact Simocatta, the modern reader still confronts numerous questions: did the Aldine editor combine and reorganise letters found in different manuscripts, or did he reproduce one or more manuscripts that contained precisely these letters and in this particular order? How does the editio princeps differ from modern editions in the organisation of the two authors’ letters? And how does this organisation affect how we interpret the letters of Alciphron and Theophylact Simocatta today?

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Émeline Marquis

This article deals with the letters of Phalaris, a large corpus of 148 letters contained in the second volume of the Aldine edition of the Greek epistolographers. It explores the role of the Aldine edition in the transmission of these letters and mainly focuses on its sources. Building on the works of Lauri Tudeer and Martin Sicherl, it determines the text on which the Aldine edition is based and its position within the manuscript tradition, while stressing the remaining uncertainties: the Aldine is an editorial construction, conflating the text of two different classes of manuscripts with the text of the editio princeps from 1498; its main sources are a close parent to the now-lost London, British Library, Harley MS 5610 and a copy of the manuscript Heidelberg, Universitätsbibliothek, Cod. Pal. graec. 356 (and not necessarily the antigraph of Vatican, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Pal. gr. 134 as Sicherl thought); Marcus Musurus might have used another corrective manuscript.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Felipe G. Hernández Muñoz

The aim of this study is to examine several aspects of the constitutio textus and the lexicon of the Letters attributed to Demosthenes, which have already been studied in previous works, and which we will now bring up to date. The following topics on the text and the lexicon of the Letters attributed to Demosthenes will be under examination. First, the text of William Rennie’s edition will be compared to that of Robert Clavaud and other later editions; second, the value of the recentiores in the edition of the Letters: the manuscripts Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España, MS 4637 (T, c.1480) and San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Biblioteca del Monasterio de El Escorial, MS R I 20 (E, s. XIV). Then, the differences and similarities between Aldine edition and the ‘Wecheliana’ will be analysed, and finally, the lexicon of the Letters attributed to Demosthenes and its relation to the rest of the Corpus Demosthenicum.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Rafael J. Gallé Cejudo

Based on the studies by Dimitrios K. Raios and Martin Sicherl, this article reviews some of the main hypotheses proposed concerning the genesis of Philostratus’s collected letters before and during the process of their inclusion in the Aldine edition by the scholar Marcus Musurus. This very preliminary analysis of the relationships between the codices most directly involved in the production of the Aldine edition suggests some initial conclusions which, although not definitive, call these hypotheses into question.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Antonia Sarri

This article examines the principles of selection and arrangement of the letters of Basil the Great in the Aldine edition and in the major manuscript families. It argues that the ordering of Basil’s letters in them was mainly based on the content of the letters, whether thematical or by addressee. The article concludes that the ancient and medieval thematical orderings of the letters are helpful for our understanding of the contents of a large collection such as that of Basil, compared to the modern reconstructed chronological order presented in the editions.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library