Sociology

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 111 items for :

  • Manchester Digital Textbooks x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Chris Perkins and Kate McLean

Smell is a ubiquitous and powerful way in which we make sense of the world, but is largely taken for granted and under-analysed. The geographies wrapped up with smell relate to our everyday experiences of place, and the mapping of these perceptions and their affects has great potential for revealing hitherto unseen social and cultural norms. This chapter charts some of the ways in which smell mapping might be enacted. It explores different temporalities associated with our smellscapes, documents the potential of different technologies and mobilities for attending to smell, and contrasts different embodied and social modes of ‘doing smell’. The links between smell and other sensory geographies are explored. In so doing it argues for a multi-sensorial turn in mundane methods.

in Mundane Methods
Abstract only
Conducting (self) interviews at sea for a surfer’s view of surfing
Lyndsey Stoodley

This chapter explores the watery and water-based method of (self) interviews at sea. Only a surfer knows the feeling, so the saying goes. In this chapter I document the process of designing and conducting an embodied, immersive (self) interviewing method in an attempt to obtain responses as close to the moment of experience as possible, to better understand this feeling and the motivations it creates. Involving a camera and a question sheet attached to a surfboard, this method draws from work on mobile methodologies and sensory ethnography utilising technology to generate audio and visual data from the perspective of the surfer. While the questions probe participants on specific topics, the place of the sea is used as an active prompt, providing insight into the movements and interactions of surfers as well as a chance for them to articulate thoughts and feelings in that moment. Through engagement in these watery encounters, this method offers a novel contribution to our understanding of human–water relations and offers future approaches for studying everyday relationships with the sea.

in Mundane Methods
Abstract only
Mike Savage

This conclusion presents some closing thoughts on the concepts covered in the preceding chapters of the book. The book is about another book Divisions of Labour. It discusses the history of work and employment on a very general scale, in order to situate the study of the Isle of Sheppey in the wider historical context of the challenge of de-industrialisation. The book focuses on household work strategies in Sheppey. It presents a case study to elaborate sociological points, hence the long historical introduction and the selection of the place as analytically appropriate for his ends. The book describes Divisions of Labour most accurately, as an amazing work which marked the turning point of a great tradition of community-based sociology, while at the same time pointing to the brave new world of large-scale panel data. It also focuses on the contemporary urgency of Ray Pahl's vision of sociology.

in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Abstract only
Sociology in search of a new jurisdiction
John Holmwood

Divisions of Labour was written on the cusp of a period of change in British society and its political economy. This chapter expresses that Ray Pahl regarded sociology itself as suffering 'incapacitation'. He was no radical in the sense that would have been understood by other sociologists at the time. Indeed, the nature of his engagement, whether with those in precarious positions/senior managers and others reflecting on success almost precluded the normal kind of radicalism. Anyone's 'private' troubles and their social structural causes interested him and amelioration could be directed at all private troubles for which a social structural cause could be identified. The argument that Pahl was beginning to articulate in Divisions of Labour proposes that an adequate address to social inequality would need to make its dynamics, and not its categorisation, central to a new sociological jurisdiction.

in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Graham Crow and Jaimie Ellis
in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Graham Crow and Jaimie Ellis
in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Graham Crow and Jaimie Ellis
in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Graham Crow and Jaimie Ellis
in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Graham Crow and Jaimie Ellis
in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Claire Wallace

The 'Sheppey project' expanded into a systematic study when Ray Pahl won a Social Science Research Council grant. One of the key concepts developed in Divisions of Labouris that of the 'household work strategy' and one of the key ways in which it was demonstrated in the book was through the evolution of women's work. Women were moving increasingly into paid employment as a normal extension of their roles. A major ESRC initiative known as the Social Change and Economic Life Initiative sought to embed these relationships in an understanding of local labour markets and their variations, taking into account larger regions than the Isle of Sheppey and ones intended to exemplify changes in Britain as a whole. Many of the insights derived from intensive study of a small island in the Thames Estuary had ramifications far wider than could ever have been initially envisaged.

in Revisiting Divisions of Labour