List of contributors
in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium

Contributors

Emiliano Aguilar has an MA from the Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Facultad de Filosofía y Letras. He has published on science fiction in journals such as Lindes and Letraceluloide and has chapters in Orphan Black and Philosophy, edited by Richard Greene (2016); The Man in the High Castle and Philosophy, edited by Bruce Krajewski (2017); Giant Creatures in our World: Essays on Kaiju and American Popular Culture, edited by Camille Mustachio and Jason Barr (2017); Twin Peaks and Philosophy, edited by Richard Greene (2018); and American Horror Story and Philosophy, edited by Richard Greene (2017), among others.

Becky Bartlett is currently a Lecturer in Film and Television at the University of Glasgow, where her teaching has included courses on cult film and television and religion in film and television. She is currently working on her monograph (Edinburgh University Press, expected 2020) and has contributed essays to Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies and the forthcoming Routledge Companion to Cult Film. Her research interests include cult cinema, bad movies, religion and film and Hollywood gorilla men.

Wickham Clayton is a Lecturer in the School of Film Production at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham. He is the author of See!Hear!Cut!Kill!: Experiencing Friday the 13th (forthcoming), editor of Style and Form in the Hollywood Slasher Film (2015) and co-editor of Screening Twilight: Critical Approaches to a Cinematic Phenomenon (with Sarah Harman, 2014). He has written a number of essays on genre (primarily horror), aesthetics and adaptation.

Chris Davies is an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Exeter. He is the author of Blockbusters and the Ancient World: Allegory and Warfare in Contemporary Hollywood, and his research interests include history on film, principally the ancient world, westerns and war films, as well as sci-fi and comic book movies. He currently works as a Senior Compliance Officer at the British Board of Film Classification. His views are his own and do not reflect those of the BBFC.

Andrew B. R. Elliott is Senior Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Lincoln, where he works on the representation of history in film, television and video games. He has published on a number of aspects relating to historical film, television and video games, from the classical world to the Middle Ages, and most recently has published on special effects in the epic film and the HBO/BBC series Rome and is editor of the collection The Return of the Epic Film (2014), featuring essays on a range of topics relating to the alleged return of the epic. His most recent book is Medievalism, Politics and Mass Media: Appropriating the Middle Ages in the Twenty-First Century (2017).

Clarice Greco is Professor in the Postgraduate Programme in Communications at Paulista University (UNIP), São Paulo and a postdoctoral researcher at the School of Communications and Arts at the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP), having received a PhD and an MA from the same institution. She is a Researcher at the Centre for Telenovela Studies at ECA-USP (CETVN) and at the Ibero-American Observatory of TV Fiction OBITEL and Vice-coordinator of Obitel Brazil-USP.

Karen Patricia Heath is a Senior Research Fellow at the Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford. She is a historian of the modern and contemporary United States, with specialist research interests in the Culture Wars, political ideologies, and the place of the arts in public life. Karen is currently preparing a book manuscript for publication, provisionally entitled Conservatives and the Politics of Federal Arts Funding, from the Great Society to the Culture Wars.

Mikel J. Koven is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at the University of Worcester. He is the author of La Dolce Morte: Vernacular Cinema and the Italian Giallo Film (2006), Film, Folklore and Urban Legends (2008) and Blaxploitation Films (2010).

Mariana Marques de Lima is a PhD candidate (funded by CAPES agency) in Communications at the School of Communications and Arts at the University of São Paulo and a researcher at the Centre for Telenovela Studies – CETVN and at the Ibero-American Observatory of TV Fiction – Obitel.

Thomas S. Mueller is a professor of advertising at Appalachian State University and the senior member of his university’s Faculty in Residence programme. He is a quantitative analyst with research interests in analytics marketing, energy research and predictive models for consumer behaviour. His work has been published in the Journal of Higher Education Management, Journal of Bullying & Social Aggression, Energy Research & Social Science and the Journal on Excellence in College Teaching.

Matthew Page is an independent scholar who has been researching in the area of the Bible on film for almost twenty years. He recently had two chapters published in De Gruyter’s The Bible in Motion: A Handbook of the Bible and Its Reception in Film (edited by Rhonda Burnette-Bletsch, 2016) and has others in The T&T Clark Companion to the Bible and Film (edited by Richard Walsh, 2018) and the forthcoming T&T Clark Companion to Jesus and Film (edited by Richard Walsh). He has also contributed numerous entries to De Gruyter’s Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception (2009–present). He currently runs the Bible Films Blog.

Fernando Gabriel Pagnoni Berns is Professor at the Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) – Facultad de Filosofía y Letras. He teaches courses on the international horror film. He is director of the research group on horror cinema ‘Grite’ and has chapters in the books Divine Horror, edited by Cynthia Miller (2017); To See the Saw Movies: Essays on Torture Porn and Post 9/11 Horror, edited by John Walliss (2013); Critical Insights: Alfred Hitchcock, edited by Douglas Cunningham (2016); Reading Richard Matheson: A Critical Survey, edited by Cheyenne Mathews (2014); and The Man in the High Castle and Philosophy, edited by Bruce Krajewski (2017), among others. He is currently writing a book about the Spanish TV horror series Historias para no Dormir.

Tissiana Nogueira Pereira is a PhD candidate (funded by CAPES agency) in Communications at the School of Communications and Arts at the University of São Paulo and a researcher at the Centre for Telenovela Studies – CETVN and at the Ibero-American Observatory of TV Fiction – Obitel.

Gregory P. Perreault is an Associate Professor of multimedia journalism at Appalachian State University. He is a media sociologist who primarily examines journalism, gaming and representations of religion. His work has been published in Journalism: Theory, Criticism & Practice, Journalism Practice, Journalism Studies, Howard Journal of Communication and Games & Culture. His research has been widely discussed in publications including VICE, Le Monde, Kotaku and Yahoo! Games.

Peter Phillips is Research Fellow in Digital Theology in the Department of Theology and Religion at Durham University, and Director of the Research Centre for Digital Theology. His most recent work is ‘The Pixelated Text’ in Theology journal, November 2018 and The Bible, Social Media and Digital Culture (Routledge Press: 2019).

Adele Reinhartz is a Professor in the Department of Classics and Religious Studies at the University of Ottawa and author of Bible and Cinema: An Introduction (2013).

Karra Shimabukuro’s work analyses folkloric figures in medieval and early modern literature and popular culture for the ways they are vehicles for the fears, desires and anxieties of a particular historical and cultural moment, and how this opens new avenues of thinking about, and challenging, well-known texts, genres and periodisations. She is an Assistant Professor at Elizabeth City State University.

Martin Stollery is the author of Alternative Empires: European Modernist Cinemas and Cultures of Imperialism (2000), L’émigré (2004) and co-author of British Film Editors (2004). He has published numerous articles and book chapters on various aspects of North African and British film history.

Thomas J. West III is an independent scholar who earned his PhD in English from Syracuse University. His dissertation, entitled ‘History’s Perilous Pleasures: Experiencing Antiquity in the Postwar Hollywood Epic’, explored the ways in which biblical epics of the 1950s and 1960s provided both an experience of and escape from the terrors of modernity. His work includes published and forthcoming essays on the HBO series Rome, the epic film The Robe and the Starz series Spartacus.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

The Bible onscreen in the new millennium

New heart and new spirit

Editor: Wickham Clayton
INFORMATION

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
METRICS

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 7 8 1
PDF Downloads 7 7 2
RELATED CONTENT