Notes
in Peter Carey

Notes

Chapter 1

1Van Ikin, Answers to seventeen questions: an interview with Peter Carey, Science Fiction: A Review of Speculative Literature, 1, 1, 1977, 33.
2Translated as ‘the trial of the real world’ in André Breton, Manifestos of Surrealism, trans. Richard Seaver and Helen R. Lane, Michigan, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1972, 47. See chapters 2 and 8 for the Australian context of surrealism.
3Ikin, Answers to seventeen questions, 34.
4Robert Ross, ‘It cannot not be there’: Borges and Australia’s Peter Carey, in Edna Aizenberg (ed.), Borges and his Successors: The Borgesian Impact on Literature and the Arts, Columbia, Miss.: University of Missouri Press, 1989, 50.
5All references to Carey’s major works will be to bracketed page numbers from the following British editions: Collected Stories, London: Faber, 1995; Bliss, London: Pan-Picador, 1982; Illywhacker, London: Faber, 1990; Oscar and Lucinda, London: Faber, 1989; The Tax Inspector, London: Faber, 1991; The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith, London: Faber, 1994; The Big Bazoohley, London: Faber, 1995.
6Captain Moonlite (1842–80) was an Irish-born bush ranger turned bandit in the 1860s – see William H. Wilde, Joy Hooton and Barry Andrews (eds), The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1986, 488 – while Frank Hardy has written powerful political novels. Ironically, he has also offered a critique of Carey as a post-modernist adman who decided to manufacture books: ‘He set out to win a prize and he did. It’s packaging.’ Louise Kennedy, Frankly speaking, The Canberra Times, 23.8.1992, 23.
7Joanna Penglase (co-writer) and Don Featherstone (co-writer and director), The most beautiful lies: a film about Peter Carey, BBC1 Omnibus, 1986–7. Also Packed lunches – writer’s talks: interview with Peter Kemp, ICA audio-tape, 12.3.1994: ‘I do like the idea of fiction as invented, made up – a totally plastic world’.
8Penglase and Featherstone, The most beautiful lies.
9Richard Yallop, A mild colonial boy is bound for Eton, The Age, 1.12.1993, 1.
10Candida Baker, Peter Carey in Yacker: Australian Writers Talk About Their Work, Sydney: Picador, 1986, 70.
11Richard Glover, The tallest story of them all, The Sydney Morning Herald Saturday Review, 29.6.1985, 39; Alan Attwood, Is this man mad? The marvellous mind of Peter Carey, Time, 22.2.1988, 55.
12Glover, Tallest story of them all, 39, for example.
13David Sexton, Review in The Literary Review, June 1985, 38.
14Gerry Turcotte (ed.), Writers in Action, The Writer’s Choice Evenings, Sydney: Currency Press, 1990, 19.
15Ray Willbanks, Speaking Volumes: Australian Writers and their Work, Ringwood: Penguin, 1992, 44.
16Ibid., 44.
17Turcotte, Writers in Action, 19.
18Alison Summers, Candid Carey, The National Times, 1–7.11.1985, 32.
19Baker, Yacker, 71.
20John F. Baker, Peter Carey, Publishers Weekly, 13.12.1991, 38; the bracketed addition was indicated by Peter Carey in a fax to the author, 28 August 1995.
21Peter Carey, Letter to Brian Kiernan, 5.3.1976, MS Dr Brian Kiernan, 7017, correspondence, National Library of Australia.
22Sexton, The Literary Review, 39.
23Carey, Letter to Kiernan, 5.3.1976.
24Sexton, The Literary Review, 38.
25Ibid.
26Tony Thwaites, More tramps at home: seeing Australia first, Meanjin, 46, 3, 1987, 403.
27Karen Lamb, Peter Carey: The Genesis of Fame, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1992, 8, n. 16.
28Anthony J. Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, St Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, xiv – see Lamb, Peter Carey, 9 for a brief description.
29Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, 187.
30Andrew Olle, Interview with Peter Carey, 26.9.88, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 89/10/1559–2.
31Peter Carey, Statement, Australian Literary Studies, 8, 2, 1977, 183.
32Lamb, Peter Carey, 8; see also p. 10 for description.
33Olle, Interview with Peter Carey.
34Sue Woolfe and Kate Grenville, Making Stories: How Ten Australian Novels Were Written, St Leonards, NSW: Allen and Unwin, 1993, 41.
35Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 45.
36Lamb, Peter Carey, 11; elsewhere called In Loving Memory of Luke McClosky, see Carey, Statement, 186.
37Lamb, Peter Carey, 11.
38Jan Garrett, Interview with Peter Carey, 8.10.1979, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 80/10/1043–5.
39John Anderson (1893–1962) was the initiator of the Sydney Freethought group. See William H. Wilde, Joy Hooton and Barry Andrews (eds), The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1986, 26.
40Frank Moorhouse, What happened to the short story?, Australian Literary Studies, 8, 2, 1977, 181.
41Valerie Lawson, Peter Carey: advertising doesn’t hurt him a scrap, The Sydney Morning Herald, 5.9.1981, 47.
42Baker, Yacker, 74–5.
43Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, 171, n. 24.
44See Baker, Yacker, 74–5; Turcotte, Writers in Action, 17.
45Kate Grenville, From The Getting of Wisdom to Illywhacker: the library and our literary heritage, Australian Library Journal, 38, 1.2.1989, 64.
46See John Docker, In a Critical Condition, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin, 1984, 83–109. I am grateful to John Thieme for this point.
47Ken Gelder and Paul Salzman, The New Diversity: Australian Fiction 1970–88, Melbourne: McPhee Gribble, 1989, 15; Michael Wilding, The tabloid story, in Michael Wilding (ed.), The Tabloid Story Pocket Book, Sydney: Wild and Woolley, 1978, 304–6.
48Grenville, From The Getting of Wisdom to Illywhacker, 62.
49Patrick White, The prodigal son, Australian Letters, 1.4.1958, 39.
50Wilding, The tabloid story, 307.
51Michael Wilding, A Random House: the parlous state of Australian publishing, Meanjin, 34, 1, 1975, 106.
52Carl Harrison-Ford, How good is the boom in Australian fiction?, The Australian Author, 7, 2, 1975, 4.
53Brian Kiernan, The Most Beautiful Lies, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1977, xii.
54Diana Giese, Brave new world of publishing, The Canberra Times, 10.9.1989, 18.
55Lamb, Peter Carey, 14.
56Laurie Hergenhan (ed.), The Penguin New Literary History of Australia, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin Australia, 1988, 540.
57Ibid., 455.
58Wilding, Tabloid, 295–6, 302.
59Wilding, Tabloid, 304–5.
60Frank Moorhouse, What happened to the short story? Australian Literary Studies, 8, 2, 1977, 179.
61Carey, Statement, 187.
62John Maddocks, Bizarre realities: an interview with Peter Carey, Southerly, 41, 1, 1981, 32–3.
63Robin Ravlich, Interview with Peter Carey, 22.10.1979, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 88/10/1864–2.
64Helen Frizell, Reputation – and power, The Sydney Morning Herald, 23.9.1980, 7.
65Jane Singleton, Interview with Peter Carey, 8.7.1985, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 85/10/798–4.
66Neil Shoebridge, Reborn agency aims to stand alone, Business Review Weekly, 3.8.1990, 85–6; additional information from Peter Carey in a fax to the author, 28 August 1995.
67Baker, Yacker, 66.
68Van Ikin, Peter Carey: the stories, Science Fiction, 1, 1.6.1977, 20, 22. The term ‘speculative fiction’ was probably first used by Robert A. Heinlein in Of Other Worlds, ed. Lloyd Arthur Eshbach, 1947. Thanks to Andy Butler for pointing this out. For Carey’s acceptance of the term see Ikin, Answers to seventeen questions, 36: ‘of course they’re speculative fiction, and I react very well to the idea of them being recognised as such’.
69Bruce Clunies Ross, Lazlo’s testament, or structuring the past and sketching the present in contemporary short fiction, mainly Australian, Kunapipi, 1, 2, 1979, 116, mentions this.
70There is a useful comparison of Carey and Bail focusing on ‘Report on the Shadow Industry’ in the acute early review of The Fat Man in History by W. Green in Westerly, 4, 1975, 73–6. A treatment of metafictionality in Carey stories, in particular ‘Do You Love Me’, can be found in Ken Gelder and Paul Salzman, The New Diversity: Australian Fiction 1970–88, Melbourne: McPhee Gribble, 1989, 116–17, and in Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, passim.
71See Michael Wilding’s selected stories, Great Climate, London: Faber, 1990.
72Frederic Jameson, Postmodernism and consumer society, in Hal Foster (ed.), Postmodern Culture, London: Pluto, 1985, 111–25. Pastiche is considered as offering ‘a key to destabilisation and deconstruction of a repressive European archive’ by some post-colonial critics – see Helen Tiffin, Introduction, in Ian Adam and Helen Tiffin (eds), Past the Last Post: Theorizing Post-Colonialism and Postmodernism, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1991, x.
73Frederic Jameson, Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, London: Verso, 1990.
74Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition, trans. G. Bennington and B. Massumi, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1984.
75John Frow, What was post-modernism?, in Adam and Tiffin, Past the Last Post, 148.
76You’ve got nothing to lose – advertising, 27.4.75, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 75.10.916 contained the earliest radio interview with Carey in which he discussed the ambiguities of being a writer and an advertiser. Unfortunately the tape has been lost.
77Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza and Gabriel García Márquez, The Fragrance of Guava, trans. Ann Wright, London: Verso, 1983, 35–6.
78Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 56–7.
79See chapters 2and 8 for a discussion of this.
80Surrealism: Revolution by Night: Canberra: National Gallery of Australia, 1993, 216, 321. Peter Carey has pointed out in correspondence with the author that there was no relation between the names of the character and the painter, although he knows James Gleeson’s work – (fax from Peter Carey, 28 August 1995).
81Homi K. Bhabha, The Location of Culture, London: Routledge, 1994, 25.
82Janet Hawley, How an ad man found bliss, The Age, 26.9.81, 26; see also Turcotte, Writers in Action, 20, Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 54.
83Harrison-Ford, How good is the boom in Australian fiction?, 7.
84See Bill Ashcroft et al. (eds), The Post-Colonial Studies Reader, London: Routledge, 1995, 117–50 and Adam and Tiffin, Past the Last Post, passim, for examples of the debates over the possible relationships between post-modernism and post-colonialism.
85Summers, Candid Carey, 32. In a fax to the author, Peter Carey commented that ‘socialist’ seemed ‘a rather moderate, centrist description’, suggesting that his actual outlook is more radical that that implies (28 August 1995).
86The text of Illusion is in the National Library of Australia manuscript collection (MS 5062) on open access. The narrator (Kevin) is enrolled to investigate a missing person, adopting a voice and appearance derived from Dashiel Hammett and Raymond Chandler detective stories as done on screen by Humphrey Bogart. This allows for a humorous pastiche effect along with other elements such as the corrupt uranium dealer, the Fat Man, echoing The Maltese Falcon and lines of classic film dialogue such as the ‘hill of beans’ speech from Casablanca. A chorus figure, the newspaper seller, reveals ‘mysterious deaths’ as he sells the newspaper ‘Illusion’. Along with songs, a slide show ‘as close to hard-core porn as possible’, on-stage sorcery and a figure called the Glowing Man, we learn of the multinational and state supported underworld of uranium production and smuggling in what is undoubtedly a fairly wayward, though intriguing, script.
87Bliss, 113.
88Turcotte, Writers in Action, 19–21, and Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 44.
89Packed lunches – writer’s talks: Interview with Peter Kemp, ICA audio-tape, 12.3.1994.
90Woolfe and Grenville, Making Stories, 39.
91Ibid., 35, 44.

Chapter 2

1The term used by Darko Suvin in Metamorphoses of Science Fiction: On the Poetics and History of a Literary Genre, New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1979, 4, to describe the intellectual and imaginative challenges to normative world views generated by the transformative effects of science fiction narratives. Thanks to Andy Butler for suggesting this link. All references to Carey’s stories will be to the volume Collected Stories except in one case where the story has not been included in that volume.
2Michael Morton-Evans, Carey reaches a blissful peak in his literary career, The Australian, 26.7.1984, 8.
3Jan Garrett, Interview with Peter Carey, 14.10.1981, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 82/10/619–2.
4See Ruth Ronen, Possible Worlds in Literary Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
5Joanna Penglase, (co-writer) and Don Featherstone (co-writer and director), The most beautiful lies: a film about Peter Carey, BBC1 Omnibus, 1986–7.
6Graeme Turner, American dreaming: the fictions of Peter Carey, Australian Literary Studies, 12, 4, O1986, 434–5.
7Thomas E. Tautsky, ‘Getting the corner right’: an interview with Peter Carey, Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada, 4, 1990, 29–30.
8D. Vines, Review of The Fat Man in History, Blacksmith, 2, 1975, 54 points this out.
9Jean Baudrillard, America, London: Verso, 1988, 77, quoted in Don Anderson, ‘I’m going to America in my mind’: the American presence in Australian writing, 1960–90, in Margaret Harris and Elizabeth Webby (eds), Reconnoitres: Essays in Australian Literature in Honour of G. A. Wilkes, Sydney: Sydney University Press, 1992, 178. For the notion of the simulacrum mentioned later in this section see Jean Baudrillard, Simulations, trans. Paul Foss, Paul Patton and Philip Beitchman, New York: Semiotext(e), 1983.
10Penglase and Featherstone, The most beautiful lies.
11Alice Munro, Lives of Girls and Women, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1982, 249.
12Graeme Gibson, Interview in Eleven Canadian Novelists, Toronto: Anansi, 1973, 256.
13Anderson, ‘I’m going to America in my mind’, 184.
14Peter Carey, Statement, Australian Literary Studies, 8, 2, 1977, 184.
15John Fiske, Bob Hodge and Graeme Turner, Myths of Oz: Reading Australian Popular Culture, Sydney: Allen and Unwin, 1987, 121–2.
16Bail’s story was included in Contemporary Portraits, St Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 1975, reprinted as The Drover’s Wife. The comparison is explored by Nigel Krauth, Peter Carey: a portrait of electricity, Australian Book Review, 133, 1991, 18.
17Murray Bail, Homesickness, Melbourne: Macmillan, 1980, 112.
18Ibid., 81.
19Ibid., 61–4.
20Anderson, ‘I’m going to America in my mind’, 184.
21John Pilger, A Secret Country, London: Vintage, 1990, 164–70. Baudrillard begins his America with a chapter on the desert as an emblem for his view that ‘the whole of America is a desert’ (99) in which ‘the cities are mobile deserts’ (123).
22Robin Ravlich, Interview with Peter Carey, 22.10.1979, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 88/10/1864–2.
23Jan Garrett, Interview with Peter Carey, 8.10.1979, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 88/10/1043–5: during the interview, Carey commented ‘hello Bart, if you’re listening’.
24John Maddocks, Bizarre realities: an interview with Peter Carey, Southerly, 41, 1, 1981, 39–40.
25Joseph, Conrad, Three Short Novels, New York: Bantam, 1963, 75.
26See pp. 314, 320, 323, 325, 327, 329, 333.
27Jan Garrett, Interview with Peter Carey, 8.10.1979.
28See obituary articles in The Guardian, 30.11.1994, G2 8, 17.
29Phillip Neilsen, Peter Carey: author’s statement, Australian Literary Studies, 10, 1, 1981, 191–2. See Albert Speer, Inside the Third Reich, London: Phoenix, 1995, 221–6. In his fictionalised version of Speer’s Berlin in the novel Fatherland (1992), Robert Harris has this great cupola gathering the breath of its multitudes to form clouds and rain in the same manner as in Carey’s story – Robert Harris, Fatherland, New York: Harper Collins, 1992, 29. See also Albert Speer, Spandau: The Secret Diaries, London: Collins, 1976.
30See Ken Gelder and Paul Salzman (eds), The New Diversity: Australian Fiction 1970–88, Melbourne: McPhee Gribble, 1989, 114.
31Kenneth Gelder, Sex in Australian fiction 1970–1987, Meanjin, 47, 1, 1987, 125.
32Gelder and Salzman, The New Diversity, 114.
33See ibid., 175–7.
34I stress this in contrast to Trudi Tate’s reading which, in its manner of talking about ‘Nile’, seems to assume at times that that ‘she’ is ‘real’ – for example ‘The events that follow are implicitly the woman’s fault for transgressing the narrative rules he has established’, etc. See Trudi Tate, Unravelling the feminine: Peter Carey’s ‘Peeling’, Meanjin, 46, 3, 1987, 394–9.
35Invoking here a Freudian model of the polymorphously perverse infant prior to social gender allocation – see Sigmund Freud, On Sexuality: Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality and Other Works, trans. James Strachey, ed. Angela Richards, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1977.
36Marjorie Garber, Vested Interests: Cross-dressing and Cultural Anxiety, New York: Routledge, 1992.
37A pun picked up by David Gilbey in his review of The Fat Man in History in Southerly, 44, 1977, 469.
38Recent post-colonial theorists like Homi Bhabha, The Location of Culture, London: Routledge, 1994, have attempted to refine or challenge the binary metaphor of dominance which has described the colonial and post-colonial situation in terms of a colonial centre enforcing power on colonised margins. Others like Diana Brydon and Bill Ashcroft have adapted from French post-structuralists Deleuze and Guattari the model of ‘the rhizome’, an interlinked system of roots and growths in which no one channel can be said to have priority – see Graham Huggan, Decolonising the map: post-colonialism, post-structuralism and the cartographic connection, in Ian Adam and Helen Tiffin (eds), Past the Last Post: Theorising Post-Colonialism and Post-modernism, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1991, 122.
39In The Pleasures of Exile (1960), George Lamming set out his influential rereading of The Tempest as a colonial text and, in doing so, indicated how the colonisation process was transformative for the coloniser as well as the colonised, who together formed a reciprocal relationship emblemised by Prospero and Caliban in Shakespeare’s play.

Chapter 3

1Graham Burns, Romantic pursuits, Australian Book Review, 41, 1982, 28; Rory Barnes, Salvation on Bog Onion Road, The National Times, 11–17.10.1981, 42; Peter Pierce, Finding their range: some recent Australian novels, Meanjin, 40, 1981, 526.
2Kate Ahearne, Stephen Williams and Kevin Brophy, An interview with Peter Carey, Going Down Swinging, 1, 1980, 49.
3Anthony J. Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, St Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 71.
4Karen Lamb, Peter Carey: The Genesis of Fame, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1992, 28.
5See chapter 5, 102–3.
6See G. Leech and J. Svartvik, A Communicative Grammar of English, Harlow: Longman, 1975, 73 – thanks to Michael Lumsden for this reference.
7Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude, London: Picador, 1982, 9.
8See pp. 10, 14, 16, 18, 20, 27, 37, 51–2, 63–5, 67–74, 148, 150, etc.
9John Ryle, Magic and poison, The Times Literary Supplement, 20.11.1981, 1350.
10Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness, London: Methuen, 1966, 70, note 9. This experience has similarities with ‘congruence’ as described by psychotherapist Carl Rogers – see Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person: A Therapist’s View of Psychotherapy, London: Constable, 1961, 61.
11See Antonio Gramsci, Selections from Prison Notebooks, ed. and trans. by Quentin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith, London: Lawrence and Wishart, 1978, 12.
12Douglas Kellner, Critical Theory, Marxism and Modernity, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989, 181, 158. Kellner argues for the term techo-capitalism to describe the present configuration which exhibits ‘growing concentration and centralisation of capital, organised in transnational conglomerates in a global system in which new advanced technologies like satellite television, computers and information, scientific and technical knowledge, and forms of consumer and mass culture are international in scope, disseminated throughout the world by transnational capital and techo-elites. Techno-capitalism depends on an increasingly high-velocity form of capital in which money, ideas, images, technologies, goods and services can be rapidly moved from one part of the world to another … Techno-culture represents a configuration of mass culture and the consumer society in which consumer goods, film, television, mass images and computerised information become a dominant form of culture throughout the developed world which increasingly interpenetrate developing countries as well’ (180–1). See also Kellner’s recent book Media Culture: Cultural Studies, Identity and Politics Between the Modern and the Post-modern, London: Routledge, 1995.
13A view associated with Norman Mailer – see Don Anderson, Introduction, in Peter Carey and Ray Lawrence, Bliss: The Screenplay, St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1986, 19–20.
14Ken Gelder suggests Alice Dalton is a derivative parallel to Big Nurse in the Kesey – Ken Gelder, Bliss and punishment, The CRNLE Reviews Journal, 1, 1983, 48. Ken Gelder has also suggested analogies with other Australian fiction such as Dal Stivens’s A Horse of Air (1970) or Walter Adamson’s The Institution (1974) which both have central characters incarcerated in mental hospitals, while David Ireland has explored the analogies between a corrupt culture and institutionalisation in The Flesheaters (1972) – see Ken Gelder, The novel, in Laurie Hergenhan (ed.), The Penguin New Literary History of Australia, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin Australia, 1988, 507.
15Ray Willbanks, Speaking Volumes: Australian Writers and their Work, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin, 1992, 48.
16Thomas E. Tausky, ‘Getting the corner right’: an interview with Peter Carey, Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada, 4, 1990, 30.
17Graham Burns, Romantic pursuits, Australian Book Review, 41, 1982, 28.
18Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor, London: Allen Lane, 1979, 87, 85, 70–1.
19Philip Neilsen, Waiting for the barbarians: an interview with Peter Carey, Literature in North Queensland, 15, 3, 1987, 69.
20David Sexton, Interview with Peter Carey, The Literary Review, June 1985, 40.
21Neilsen, Waiting for the barbarians, 70.
22Jan Garrett, Interview with Peter Carey, 14.10.1981, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 82/10/619–2.
23See chapter 8 for a summary.
24Neilsen, Waiting for the barbarians, 70; see Karen Lamb, Peter Carey: The Genesis of Fame, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1992, 25, note 3 for other earlier titles for Bliss: A Wonderful Fool and Knocking on Heaven’s Door.
25Jill Neville, Carey leaps crannies in a single bound, The Sydney Morning Herald, 10.10.1981, 44.
26Carey and Lawrence, Bliss, 14.
27Ibid., 15.
28For an approach which places Illywhacker in a Bakhtinian context see Ronald Blaber and Marvin Gilman, Roguery: The Picaresque Tradition in Australian, Canadian and Indian Fiction, Springwood, NSW: Butterfly Books, 1990.

Chapter 4

1See Lauri Muller, Publishing in crisis, Australian Bookseller and Publisher, 65, 956, December 1985–January 1986, 13–14.
2See Mark Rubbo, Starters and writers, Australian Book Review, 75, 1985, 2.
3David Sexton, The Literary Review, June 1985, 41.
4From Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World (1897), also published as More Tramps Abroad.
5Thomas E. Tausky, ‘Getting the corner right’: an interview with Peter Carey, Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada, 4, 1990, 31.
6Carey has acknowledged that Anderson is an invention (John Baxter, Interview with Peter Carey, 28.5.1985, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 86/10/462–2).
7In 1992 the Australian High Court ruled on the case of Eddie Mabo and Others versus the State of Queensland, ten years after the action had been initiated: the judgement gave recognition to Aboriginal claims of native title and rejected the notion of Australia as having been terra nullius at the time of colonisation. See Merete Falck Borch, Eddie Mabo and Others v. the State of Queensland, 1992. The significance of court recognition of landrights in Australia, Kunapipi, 14, 1, 1992, 1–12 and Tim Rowse, Mabo and moral anxiety, Meanjin, 52, 2, 1993, 229–52.
8Tausky, ‘Getting the corner right’, 32.
9William H. Wilde, Joy Hooton and Barry Andrews (eds), The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1986, 661 – quoted from letter by Furphy to A. G. Stephens, 1897; see Paul Sharrad, Responding to the challenge: Peter Carey and the reinvention of Australia, Span or Journal of the South Pacific Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies, 25, 1987, 37, n. 1 for links with Such is Life.
10See Salman Rushdie, Midnight’s Children, London: Picador, 1982, 166. See also Rushdie’s essay ‘Errata’: or unreliable narration in Midnight’s Children, in Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981–1991, London: Granta, 1991, 22–5.
11Baxter, Interview.
12Wilde et al., Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, 286.
13Candida Baker, Peter Carey in Yacker: Australian Writers Talk About Their Work, Sydney: Picador, 1986, 61.
14John Hanrahan, A dealer in dreams, visions, images and lies, The Age Saturday Extra, 6.7.1985, 14.
15Elizabeth Webby, A great short story trapped in a fat novel, The Sydney Morning Herald, 13.7.1985, 47; Martin Duwell, The lie of the land, Overland, 101, 1985, 93.
16Ray Willbanks, Speaking Volumes: Australian Writers and their Work, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin, 1992, 51.
17Ibid.
18Ibid.
19Antoni Jach, An interview with Peter Carey, Mattoid, 31, 2, 1988, 28.
20Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 52.
21See Michael Heyward, The Ern Malley Affair, St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1993.
22Peter Fuller, Carey gives the lie to some old lies, The Canberra Times, 21.8.1985, 27.
23Baxter, Interview.
24Sharrad, Responding to the challenge, 38, n. 6.
25Adrian Mitchell, Weaving a tangled web of lovely lies, The Weekend Australian Magazine, 6–7.7.1985, 15.
26John Pilger, A Secret Country, London: Vintage, 1990, 345.
27Ibid., 313, 317, 318.
28Zee Edgell, Beka Lamb, London: Heinemann, 1985, 35–7.
29Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 49.
30Sexton, The Literary Review, 40.
31Richard Glover, The tallest story of them all, The Sydney Morning Herald, 29.6.1985, 39. See Pilger, A Secret Country, chapter 5 for coverage of this event.
32Webby, A great short story, 47.
33The original arcade inspiration came from a pet shop above Dymocks book shop in George Street, Sydney, and from the Strand arcade between Pitt and Castlereagh Streets; see Willbanks, Speaking Volumes, 50. The Herbert Badgery sections of the Penglase/Featherstone video about Carey, ‘The most beautiful lies’ give a good impression.
34Tausky, ‘Getting the corner right’, 32.
35Tony Thwaites, More tramps at home: seeing Australia first, Meanjin, 46, 3, 1987, 402.
36See Peter Marshall, Demanding the Impossible: A History of Anarchism, London: Fontana, 1993, 409.
37Chomsky adopted the phrase from Walter Lippmann, reversing its political direction, in his Deterring Democracy, London: Vintage, 1992, 367; see also 348.
38Baxter, Interview.
39Martin Duwell speculates that the use of the word ‘Professor’ might be a deliberate Americanization of the more specialised Australian usage (Duwell, The lie of the land, 93).
40Thwaites, More tramps at home, 406.
41Pilger, A Secret Country, 352.

Chapter 5

1Margaret Harris, Eminent Victorians?, Southerly, 49, 1, 1989, 109.
2Thanks to Jo Chipperfield for this inventive suggestion.
3Geoffrey Dutton, Carey and the cringe, The Weekend Australian Magazine, 20–1.2.1988, 7.
4Joanna Penglase (co-writer) and Don Featherstone (co-writer and director), The most beautiful lies: a film about Peter Carey, BBC1 Omnibus, 1986–7.
5Sue Woolfe, and Kate Grenville, Making Stories: How Ten Australian Novels Were Written, Sydney: Allen and Unwin, 1993, 38.
6David Sexton, The Literary Review, June 1985, 41.
7Patricia Rolfe, The making of Oscar, The Bulletin, 23.2.1988, 69.
8The extra chapter, called ‘A degree from Oxford’ and numbered 74, contains an account of Lucinda’s meeting with Mr d’Abbs in which she convinces him of Oscar’s adequacy as a potential employee – see Peter Carey, Oscar and Lucinda, New York: Harper and Row, 1988, 286–9, and Oscar and Lucinda, London: Faber, 1995.
9A flaw acknowledged by Carey: ‘I changed the dates half-way through and forgot I had done it’ (Thomas E. Tausky, ‘Getting the corner right’: an interview with Peter Carey, Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada, 4, 1990, 35).
10Sexton, The Literary Review, 39.
11See Bruce Woodcock, Male Mythologies: John Fowles and Masculinity, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester, 1984, for a discussion of the way in which such post-modern strategies relate to the deconstruction of gender roles.
12The obsession with glass goes back to the stories like ‘Fragrance of Roses’ with its description of the ‘intricately wrought glasshouse, as delicate and weblike as the glasshouse in Kew Gardens in London’ (295), and to Bliss; Carey’s conception for the design of a house with Margot Hutcheson was of ‘a lot of glass’ (Janet Hawley, How an ad man found bliss, The Age, 26.9.1981, 26).
13Laurel Graeber, Belief in the ultimate gamble, New York Times Book Review, 29.5.1988, 19; the extract from the drafts of Oscar and Lucinda quoted in Woolfe and Grenville (44) has the injunction ‘READ PASCAL’ – see chapter 1, p. 15 above.
14Woolfe and Grenville, Making Stories, 39.
15Paul Davis and John Gribbin, The Matter Myth: Towards Twenty-first Century Science, London: Viking, 1991, 219–25.
16Thanks to Jo Chipperfield for this phrase.
17For a discussion of the philosophical aspects of fictional worlds, see Ruth Ronen, Possible Worlds in Literary Theory, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Chapter 6

1Karl Marx, Capital, vol. 1, intro. Ernest Mandel, trans. Ben Fowkes, Harmondsworth: Penguin/London: New Left Review, 1976, 799.
2Jen Craig, The real thing, Southerly, 52, 1, 1992, 152.
3Phillipa Hawker, Carey’s contemporary angels have the potential for destruction, Australian Book Review, 133, 1991, 17.
4Barry Oakley, Gothic splendour, The Weekend Australian, 27–8.7.1991, 1.
5Diana Giese, Diving deep into the dreams of damaged lives, The Weekend Australian, 27–8.7.1991, Review, 4.
6Michael Heywood, Australia’s literary ambassador, The Age, 25.7.1992, 8.
7See Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality: An Introduction, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1978, 109–10, 129–30 on incest and the regulation of sexuality in the family.
8John F. Baker, Peter Carey, Publishers Weekly, 238, 54, 13.12.1991, 37; Candida Baker, Carefree Carey, The Age Magazine, 27.7.1991, 3.
9Peter Pierce, A stumble, no more, The Bulletin, 13.8.1991, 112.
10Robert Dixon, The logic of the excluded middle, Literature in North Queensland, 18, 2, 1991, 136, 139–40.
11Robert Dixon, Closing the can of worms: enactments of justice in Bleak House, The Mystery of a Hansom Cab, and The Tax Inspector, Westerly, 37, 4, 1992, 38, 43–4.
12Robert Dessaix, Interview with Peter Carey, 25.8.1991, Australian Broadcasting Corporation tape 91/10/1249–1.
13Homi K. Bhabha, The Location of Culture, London: Routledge, 1994, 9.
14Mark Lawson, Sniffing the air at home and away, The Independent on Sunday, 25.9.1991, 18.
15Definitions of the terms psychopathic and psychotic can be found in The Oxford Companion to the Mind, ed. Richard Gregory, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987, 651–3, 657–8.
16Carol Ann Duffy, Selling Manhattan, London: Anvil, 1987, 29.
17Karen Lamb, Peter Carey: The Genesis of Fame, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1992, 54.
18Dessaix, Interview; see also Richard Glover, Peter Carey’s Sydney Babylon, The Sydney Morning Herald, 27.7.1991, 35.
19See Anthony J. Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, St Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 157 for context.
20Dessaix, Interview.
21Chris Floyd, Review, Span, 33, May 1992, 180.
22See Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, 164, 185.
23Glover, Peter Carey’s Sydney Babylon, 35; see also Carey’s letter to Hassall in Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam, 185.
24Baker, Carefree Carey, 3.
25Bron Sibree, Novel difficult to live with, difficult to write: Carey, The Canberra Times Magazine, 27.7.1991, C7.

Chapter 7

1Carey has said that Le Guin is ‘an astonishing writer in anybody’s language and if I was half as good as she is I’d be very happy indeed’, in Van Ikin, Answers to seventeen questions: an interview with Peter Carey, Science Fiction: A Review of Speculative Literature, 1, 1, 1977, 36. See also Bruce Woodcock, Radical Taoism: Ursula K. Le Guin’s science fiction, in Gina Wisker (ed.), It’s My Party: Reading Twentieth Century Women’s Writing, London: Pluto, 1994, 193–211.
2Angela Carter, Only a surface paradise, The Guardian, 29.8.1991, 22.
3Homi Bhabha, Of mimicry and man: the ambivalence of colonial discourse in The Location of Culture, London: Routledge, 1994, 86, 88. Bhabha’s view is summarised by Graham Huggan as follows: ‘The destabilising process set in motion by colonial mimicry produces a set of deceptive, even derisive, “resemblances” which implicitly question the homogenising practices of colonial discourse’ (Graham Huggan, Decolonising the map: post-colonialism, post-structuralism and the cartographic connection, in Ian Adam and Helen Tiffin (eds), Past the Last Post: Theorizing Post-Colonialism and Post-modernism, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1991, 126). The mouse costume itself might be associated with Baudrillard’s writings on the Simulacrum, although Carey’s use of the idea here has less in common than in the case of the model in ‘American Dreams’ – see note 9 for chapter 2, above.
4Packed lunches – writer’s talks: interview with Peter Kemp, ICA audio-tape, 12.3.1994.
5Kate Kellaway, Every man is a theatre, The Observer Review, 11.9.1994, 18.
6Susannah Frankel found the book ‘hilariously funny’ (Time Out, 7–14.9.1994, 47).
7Packed lunches – writer’s talks.
8Galen Strawson, A little yearning is a dangerous thing, The Independent on Sunday, 4.9.1994, 34.
9Sue Wyndham, Peter Carey: an unusual life, The Australian Magazine, 20–1.8.1994, 45. See also ICA audio-tape account.
10Kellaway, Every man is a theatre, 18.
11Wyndham, Peter Carey: an unusual life, 45.
12ICA audio-tape.

Chapter 8

1Alan Attwood, What the Dickens?, Sydney Morning Herald, Good Weekend section, 2.8.1997, 24.
2Anthony J. Hassall, A tale of two countries: Jack Maggs and Peter Carey’s fiction, Australian Literary Studies, 18, 2, 1997, 129.
3Peter Carey at the launch of Jack Maggs, Sydney 11.8.1997.
4See Robert H. Wozniak, Mind and Body: René Descartes to William James, online at: http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/Mind/Trance.html.
5William H. Wilde et. al., The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1991, 178.
6Robert Hughes, Beyond the Fatal Shore, BBC2, 2000.
7John Thieme, Postcolonial Con-texts: Writing Back to the Canon, London: Continuum, 2001, 119.
8Interview with Peter Carey online at: www.randomhouse.com/boldtype/0399/carey/interview.html.
9Attwood, What the Dickens?, 23.
10Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism, London: Vintage, 1994, xvi; Robert Hughes, The Fatal Shore: A History of the Transportation of Convicts to Australia 1787–1868, London, Pan, 1987, 586.
11Said, Culture and Imperialism, xvii
12As Anthony Hassall points out (134), there is a sub-genre of Australian fiction chronicling ‘disillusioned returns to the motherland’, best represented by Henry Handel Richardson’s novel trilogy The Fortunes of Richard Mahony (1917–29).
13Hassall, A tale of two countries, 130 fn. 3.
14Thieme, Postcolonial Con-texts, passim.
15Hassall, A tale of two countries, 130. See also James Bradley, Bread and sirkuses: empire and culture in Peter Carey’s The Unusual Life of Tristran Smith and Jack Maggs, Meanjin, 56, 3–4, 659–61.
16Ramona Koval, The unexamined life Meanjin, 56, 3–4, 1997, 671.
17Koval, The unexamined life, 674.
18Desmond Christy, Inner conviction, The Guardian Review, 11.6.1998, 8.
19Peter Carey, A small memoir, The New Yorker, September 1995, 54–63; Attwood, What the Dickens?, 26.
20Koval, The unexamined life, 671.
21Attwood, What the Dickens?, 24.
22Christy, Inner conviction.
23Sigrun Meinig (An Australian convict in the great English city: Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs, Southerly, 6, 3, 2000, 59) suggests that ‘the binary oppositions within London mirror the familiar ones that contrast the centre with the margin’, and quotes Judith Walkowitz’s view (in City of Dreadful Night – Narratives of Sexual Danger in Late-Victorian London, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992, 26) that the East and West sides of London ‘doubled for England and its Empire’.
24Ramona Koval, The unexamined life, 671.
25Sigmund Freud, from ‘The Uncanny’ 1919, printed in Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, Literary Theory: An Anthology, Oxford: Blackwell, 2001, 163.
26Máire ní Fhlathúin, The location of childhood: ‘Great Expectations’ in post-colonial London, Kunapipi, 21, 2, 1999, 90.

Chapter 9

1Ramona Koval, The unexamined life, Meanjin, 56, 3–4, 1997, 674.
2Andrew Riemer, Ironclad irony, The Sydney Morning Herald, 14.8.2000, online: www.smh.com.au.
3Anthony Quinn, Robin Hood of the outback www.nytimes.com/books/01/01/07/reviews/010107.07quinnt.ht. Such enthusiasm is not the case for all readers, however, as the following responses by panel members in the BBC ‘People’s Booker’ discussions testified: ‘True History of the Kelly Gang reads like a book that is very pleased with itself. Look at me, the book says: I can reproduce a vernacular that suggests the narrator is ignorant at the same time as it announces the Cheshire-Cat-genius of its author. It wears its stylish erudition on its sleeve and after two hundred pages or more it all gets to be rather tiresome’ (Peter Wild, BBC Arts User); ‘It’s a bit of a rant … I wouldn’t recommend this to a friend unless I hated them just a little bit’ (Alain de Botton) see online: www.bbc.co.uk/arts/booker/carey.shtml.
4Alex McDermott (ed.), The Jerilderie Letter, London: Faber, 2001. For information on Ned Kelly’s life see Ian Jones, Ned Kelly: A Short Life, Port Melbourne: Lothian Books, 1995. Websites include: www.ironoutlaw.com/. The Jerilderie Letter can be accessed along with other Kelly documents on the State Library of Victoria website at http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/slv/exhibitions/treasures/jerilderie/.
5Robert McCrum, Reawakening Ned, The Observer, 7.1.2001, 19.
6McDermott, The Jerilderie Letter, 63–4.
7McCrum, Reawakening Ned, 19.
8Interview for BBC World Service Meridian Masterpiece: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/arts/highlights/010803_carey.shtml.
9Compare Carey 159 with McDermott 56, and Carey 161–2 with McDermott 9–16. Actual or adapted phrases are sometimes included, such as ‘it caused my fist to come into collision with McCormick’s nose and he lost his equilibrium and fell prostrate’ (KG 159); ‘my fist came in collision with McCormack’s nose and caused him to loose his equilibrium and fall prostrate’ (McDermott 5–6).
10BBC2 People’s Booker broadcast, 6.10.2001.
11McDermott, The Jerilderie Letter, xxv, xxvii.
12McCrum, Reawakening Ned, 19.
13Eric Hobsbawm, Bandits, London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1969, 13, 112–13.
14Phil Shannon, Ideological gunfighters for the poor, online at: www.greenleft.org.au/back/2001/447/447p25.htm.
15BBC2 People’s Booker 6.10.2001.
16Stuart Wavell, What kind of notorious outlaw wears a frock?, The Sunday Times News Review, 7.1.2001, 7.
17Graham Huggan, Cultural memory in postcolonial fiction: the uses and abuses of Ned Kelly, Australian Literary Studies, 20, 3, May 2002, 149.
18John Kinsella’s On Peter Carey’s True History of the Kelly Gang, online at www.johnkinsella.org/reviews/carey.html: Kinsella interestingly points out that ‘One of the websites dedicated to Ned Kelly, tied up in the kind of Australian republicanism too often intertwined with xenophobia, carries a warning that people must not read Carey’s book as fact. The site decries the book’s elements of transvestism, Ned Kelly having a child, and so on. Details, it claims, that don’t match the “true history”! On one level this is missing the point, but on another it is also a rebuttal of the hype that goes behind such a work.’
19Huggan, Cultural memory in postcolonial fiction, 153, 146.
20Riemer, Ironclad irony.
21McCrum, Reawakening Ned, 19.
22Alan Attwood, What the Dickens?, Sydney Morning Herald, Good Weekend section, 2. 8, 1997, 26.
23See Huggan for a discussion of Drewe’s novel and Carey’s in relation to their treatments of the Kelly story and the issues of cultural memory.
24One example is the McCormack episode and is comparable with Carey’s version quoted in footnote 9: ‘The horse jumps forward and my fist comes into collision with McCormack’s nose and causes him to lose his equilibrium.’ (Robert Drewe, Ours Sunshine, Victoria: Penguin, 2001, 31.)
25‘currency lads’ are ‘born of the colonies rather than in Ireland’ – Kinsella.
26Jose de Acosta, The Naturall and Morall Historie of the East and West Indies, translated by Edward Grimston (London: V. Sims. 1604). See online: http://cwx.prenhall.com/bookbind/pubbooks/faragher6/medialib/chapter1/1.html. ‘The Jesuit priest Jose de Acosta (1540–1600) spent seventeen years, from 1570 to 1587, in Spanish America, working in areas as widely separated as Peru and Mexico. His book Historia natural y moral de las Indias (1590) is invaluable for Acosta’s astute observations of the native cultures of the Americas and the dramatic effects of colonization … Acosta was first to propose that the Americas had been populated by migration from the Old World.’
27Judith Kapferer, Being All Equal: Identity, Difference and Australian Cultural Practice, Oxford: Berg, 1996, 50.
28Meridian Masterpiece.
29Meridian Masterpiece.
30See McDermott, The Jerilderie Letter, 65–72.
31Meridian Masterpiece.
32Ibid.
33These famous words became the title for an equally famous early Australian novel by Joseph Furphy, published in 1903.
34McCrum, Reawakening Ned, 19.
35Ibid.
36Riemer, Ironclad irony.
37Wavel, ‘What kind of notorious outlaw wears a frock?’ The ‘coffin letter’ Ned sends, from which this quotation comes (328–9) is a virtual transcription of the end of the Jerilderie Letter (JL, 81–3).
38Wavel, 7 and Anne Marsh, Ned Kelly by any other name, Journal of Visual Culture, www.sagepub.co.uk/journals/details/issue/sample/a022422.pdf: ‘Nolan read everything that he could about the Kelly Gang, including the official police records which document Hart’s transvestism (Andrew Sayers, Sidney Nolan: The Ned Kelly Story, New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1994, 9). Elizabeth McMahon says that: ‘Legend has it that Hart’s horsemanship was such that he won the Greta races wearing feminine garb and riding side-saddle, as he is posed in Nolan’s painting’ (Elizabeth McMahon, Australia crossed over; images of cross-dressing in Australian art and culture, Art and Australia, 34, 30, 1997: 375).’
39Marsh, Ned Kelly by any other name.
40Huggan, Cultural memory in postcolonial fiction, 147.
41Riemer, Ironclad irony.
42Huggan, Cultural memory in postcolonial fiction, 148–9.
43Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Can the subaltern speak?, in Cary Nelson and Lawrence Grossberg, Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1988.
44Judith Kapferer, Being All Equal, Oxford, 59.

Chapter 10

1Brian Kiernan, Short story chronicle, Meanjin, 34, 1975, 39.
2Bruce A. Clunies Ross, Laszlo’s testament; or, structuring the past and sketching the present in contemporary short fiction, mainly Australian, Kunapipi, 1, 2, 1979, 121.
3Greg Manning, Reading lesson: ‘The Fat Man in History’, teaching and deconstructive practice, Span or Journal of the South Pacific Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies, 21, 1985, 40–1.
4Michael Wilding, The tabloid short story, in Michael Wilding (ed.), The Tabloid Story Pocket Book, Sydney: Wild and Woolley, 1978, 305. The term ‘fabulation’ was coined by Robert Scholes, The Fabulators, New York: Oxford University Press, 1967 – see Graeme Turner, American dreaming: the fictions of Peter Carey, Australian Literary Studies, 12, 4, 1986, 432.
5Bruce Bennett, Australian experiments in short fiction, World Literature Written in English, 15, 1976, 359–66.
6Kate Ahearne, Peter Carey and short fiction in Australia, Going Down Swinging (Melbourne), 1, 1980, 16–17.
7Kiernan, Short story chronicle, 39.
8Michael Morton-Evans, Carey reaches a blissful peak in his literary career, The Australian, 26.7.1984, 8.
9Geoffrey Dutton, A ‘crime’ that is utter creativity, The Bulletin, 4.12.1979, 66–7.
10Kate Ahearne, Stephen Williams and Kevin Brophy, An interview with Peter Carey, Going Down Swinging, 1, 1980, 50.
11Helen Daniel, ‘The liar’s lump’ or ‘A salesman’s sense of history’: Peter Carey’s Illywhacker, Southerly, 47, 2, 1986, 158, 166, and Helen Daniel, Lies for sale: Peter Carey, in Daniel, Liars, Australian New Novelists, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin, 1988, 168, 176.
12Brian Edwards, Deceptive constructions: the art of building in Peter Carey’s Illywhacker, Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada, 4, 1990, 39–56 – see also Robert R. Wilson, Theory as template: the new Australian novel, Mattoid, 33, 1989, 169; Greg Manning, A litany of lies: a look at Australia’s new fiction, The Age Monthly Review, 8, 3, 1988, 5–6.
13Harris, Eminent Victorians?, Southerly, 49, 1, 1989, 11–13.
14Wenche Ommundsen, Narrative navel-gazing, or, how to recognise a metafiction when you see one, Southern Review, 22, 3, 1989, 264–74.
15Anthony J. Hassall, Telling lies and stories: Peter Carey’s Bliss, Modern Fiction Studies, 35, 4, 1989, 644. See Anthony J. Hassall, Dancing on Hot Macadam: Peter Carey’s Fiction, St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1994.
16Tony Thwaites, More tramps at home: seeing Australia first, Meanjin, 46, 3, 1987, 403–5.
17M.D. Fletcher, Post-colonial Peter Carey, Span or Journal of the South Pacific Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies, 32, 1991, 12.
18Kirsten Holst Peterson, Gambling on reality: a reading of Oscar and Lucinda, in Giovanna Capone (ed.), European Perspectives: Contemporary Essays on Australian Literature, Australian Literary Studies Special Issue, 15, 2, St Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 1991, 110.
19Graham Huggan, Is the (Günther) Grass greener on the other side? Oskar and Lucinde in the New World, World Literature Written in English, 30, 1, 1990, 1–10.
20David Callahan, Peter Carey’s Oscar and Lucinda and the subversion of subversion, Australian Literary Studies, 10, 1981, 178–80.
21Graeme Turner, Nationalising the author: the celebrity of Peter Carey, Australian Literary Studies, 16, 2, 1993, 131–9.
22Karen Lamb, Peter Carey: The Genesis of Fame, Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1992. For example, Lamb attributes the interview quotation on pp. 36–7 to the wrong source: it actually comes from the interview with Richard Glover in The Sydney Morning Herald, 29.6.1985, 39.
23Lamb, Peter Carey, 28, 33–41.
24Kenneth Gelder, History, politics and the (post) modern: receiving Australian fiction, Meanjin, 47, 3, 1988, 558.
25Laurie Hergenhan, The Penguin New Literary History of Australia, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin Australia, 1988, 460.
26Carolyn Bliss, The revisionary lover: misprision of the past in Peter Carey, Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada, 6, 91, 45.
27John F. Baker, Peter Carey, Publishers Weekly, 238, 54, 13.12.1991, 37.
28Amanda Lohrey, The dead hand of orthodoxy, Island Magazine, 27, 1986, 20–1.
29Van Ikin, Peter Carey in L. Henderson (ed.), Contemporary Novelists, Chicago: St James Press, 1991, 177.
30Stephen Muecke, Wide open spaces: horizontal readings of Australian literature, New Literatures Review, 16, 1988, 7.
31K.L. Goodwin, Muecke’s map for reading Australian literature: some alternative legends, New Literatures Review, 17, 1989, 80–7.
32Morris Lurie, A fat man’s festival of short stories, Nation Review, 29 November–5 December, 1974, 204: Lurie granted the book a short paragraph, commenting bitchily ‘myths and parables, I suppose, but lacking that reverberation that grants meaning, and all done in rhythmless broken toothed prose, oh so deadly serious and symbolic’.
33Morris Lurie, Letter to Kiernan, 10.4.1976, MS Dr Brian Kiernan, 7017, correspondence, National Library of Australia.
34Craig Munro in Gelder and Salzman (eds), The New Diversity: Australian Fiction 1970–88, Melbourne: McPhee Gribble, 1989, 15.
35Graham Burns, Romantic pusuits, Australian Book Review, 41, 1982, 28.
36Peter Pierce, Finding their range: some recent Australian novels, Meanjin, 40, 1981, 526.
37John Tranter, Hell without logic loses credibility, Age, 3.10.1981, 27.
38John Ryle, Magic and poison, The Times Literary Supplement, 20.11.1981, 1350.
39Helen Daniel, Liars: Australian New Novelists, Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin, 1988, 165–6.
40Rory Barnes, Salvation on Bog Onion Road, The National Times, 11–17.10.1981, 42.
41Susan McKernan, Recent fiction, Overland, 88, 1982, 58.
42Martin Duwell, The lie of the land, Overland, 101, 1985, 93.
43Lee, 28.
44Tranter, Hell without logic loses credibility, 27.
45See Lamb, Peter Carey, 27.
46Candida Baker, Yacker: Australian Writers Talk About Their Work, Sydney: Picador, 1986, 67.
47Antonella Riem Natale, Harry Joy’s children: the art of story telling in Peter Carey’s Bliss, Australian Literary Studies, 16, 3, 1994, 342–3.
48Peter Goldsworthy, The novella in Illywhacker, Island Magazine, 24, Spring 1985, 57.
49Van Ikin, Mixed blessings, Phoenix Review, 1, Summer 1986/7, 126.
50Elizabeth Webby, Illywhacker: a great short story trapped in a fat novel, The Sydney Morning Herald, 13.7.1985, 47.
51Adrian Mitchell, Weaving a tangled web of lovely lies, The Weekend Australian Magazine, 6.7.1985, 15.
52Geoffrey Dutton, Unlocking the showman’s ‘beautiful lies’, The Bulletin, 16.7.1985, 90.
53Andrew Hislop, Whoppers and warnings, The Times Literary Supplement, 3.5.1985, 492.
54Tom Collins, Introduction, Such Is Life, North Ryde, NSW: Eden, 1989, vi.
55Peter Pierce, I dips me lid to a glorious vagabond, The National Times, 5.7.1985, 30.
56John Hanrahan, A dealer in dreams, visions, images and lies, The Age Saturday Extra, 6.7.1985, 14.
57Marion Halligan, Peter Carey’s palace of delight, The Canberra Times, 24.8.1985, B2.
58Laurie Clancy, Some beautiful lies: our history mythologised, Australian Book Review, 73, 1985, 14–15.
59Howard Jacobson, Dirty very old man, New York Times Book Review, 17.11.1985, 15.
60Annette Stewart, The Booker Prize, Quadrant, 251, 12, December 1988, 66.
61Don Anderson, Peter Carey does a wonderful thing, The Sydney Morning Herald, 20.2.1988, 71.
62Elizabeth Riddell, Desire, gambling and glass, Australian Book Review, 98, 1988, 14.
63Margaret Harris, Eminent Victorians?, Southerly, 49, 1, 1989, 110–11.
64D.J. O’Hearn, Plotting (2): a quarterly account of recent fiction, Overland, 114, 1989, 52.
65Gerard Windsor, Peter Carey’s old-fashioned special effects, The Bulletin 23.2.1988, 70 – quoted in Harris, Eminent Victorians? 110.
66Howard Jacobson, A wobbly odyssey, The Weekend Australian Magazine, 20–1.2.1988, 13.
67Mary Rose Liverani, Books for our time, Overland, 110, 1988, 70.
68C.K. Stead, Careyland, Scripsi, 5, 2, 1989, 5–6.
69Lorna Sage, Backwards into destiny, The Times Literary Supplement, 1–7.4.1988, 363.
70Matthew Da Silva, Peter Carey’s Oscar and Lucinda, Outrider 6, 2, 1989, 146–59.
71A.P. Riemer, Brutish and nasty, The Sydney Morning Herald, 3.8.1991, 43.
72Peter Pierce, A stumble, no more, The Bulletin, 13.8.1991, 112.
73Richard Glover, Peter Carey’s Sydney Babylon, The Sydney Morning Herald, 27.7.1991, 35.
74Elizabeth Jurman (ed.), Today’s people: literary matters, The Sydney Morning Herald, 30.1.92, no page number.
75Lamb, Peter Carey, 52–4.
76Jurman, Today’s people.
77Graeme Turner, Nationalising the author: the celebrity of Peter Carey, Australian Literary Studies, 16, 2, 1993, 136.
78Helen Daniel, The tax inspector and the gremlins, The Age Saturday Extra, 27.7.1991, 9.
79L. Clancy, Brilliant episodes, Australian Society, 10, 8, 38–9.
80Veronica Brady, Births and deaths, Overland, 125, 1991, 82.
81Robert Dixon, The logic of the excluded middle, Literature in North Queensland, 18, 2, 1991, 133–41; Robert Dixon, Closing the can of worms: enactments of justice in Bleak House, The Mystery of a Hansom Cab, and The Tax Inspector, Westerly, 37, 4, 1992, 37–45.
82Angela Carter, Only a surface paradise, The Guardian, 29.8.1991, 22.
83Eden Liddelow, New model Carey, Scripsi, 7, 2, October 1991, 93–100, 96, 98–9.
84Turner, Nationalising the author, 136.
85Philip Hensher, Heaven and Disneyland, The Guardian, 11.10.1994, G2, 8.
86Peter Kemp, Flamboyant fabrication, The Sunday Times, 4.9.1994, section 7, 13.
87Galen Strawson, A little yearning is a dangerous thing, The Independent on Sunday, 4.9.1994, 34.
88Geraldine Brennan, Crossing the high wires, The Observer Review, 4.9.1994, 16.
89April Bernard, Un-Efican activities, New York Review of Books, 42, 11, 22.6.1995, 46, 48.
90Andrew Riemer, The antipodes of tiny Tristan, The Sydney Morning Herald, 20.8.1994, no page number.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 27 8 0
PDF Downloads 37 16 1