‘I Almost Dread to Tell You’
Gothic Melodrama and the Aesthetic of Silence in Thomas Holcroft‘s A Tale of Mystery
in Gothic Studies
Abstract only
Log-in for full text

Individual article purchase

Individual articles are available for purchase via Reprints Desk, click below for more information

Reprints Desk

 

Have an Access Token?

You can redeem an access token by logging in through the link below

Redeem token

 

Have Institutional Access?

Access content through your institution by choosing the below option and using your institutional log-in.

Connect via institution

Focusing on melodrama and on Thomas Holcroft‘s exemplary A Tale of Mystery (1802) in particular, this essay proposes a reinterpretation of Gothic drama and theatre as constitutively characterized by interruptions of comprehension. The tribulations of its persecuted protagonist Francisco are read in the context of the court trial of a real-life Francisco, who lived in London in 1802 and was one of the ‘stars’ in contemporary newspaper reports from the Old Bailey. Combining different generic and tonal modes, Romantic-period Gothic melodrama capitalized on explicitness and hyperbole, as well as on materializations of ethics and sentiment through their overt exhibition on stage or ‘ostension’. At the same time, it emphasized absence, silence, dematerialization and dissolution. With its continuously deferred revelations,and ostensions of the unsaid, A Tale of Mystery is a significant investment in an aesthetic of the unsaid that is central to a definition of Gothic on stage.

INFORMATION
METRICS
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 18 7 0
Full Text Views 16 8 0
PDF Downloads 12 3 0
RELATED CONTENT